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Dynamic Chiropractic – February 26, 1993, Vol. 11, Issue 05
Dynamic Chiropractic
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Dynamic Chiropractic

High Volume Family Practice

By Stanley Greenfield, RHU

In my November 6, 1992 article in MPI's Dynamic Chiropractic, I wrote a little bit about my son's practice in Danvers, Massachusetts. At that time he was seeing over 100 patients a day with less than 13 percent of his practice as personal injury. I wrote about his family practice and all the kids I saw him adjust. Jeffrey, by the way, graduated from LACC in 1988. I did an article about him in June 1989, and what I hoped his practice would be back then. I am proud of what he has accomplished and the practice he has built for himself.

From all the letters I received, a lot of you were impressed too. Many had questions about his practice and how he built it so fast. I gave Jeffrey a call and asked him that very question, and here is some of what he had to say on that subject:

Thoughts on High Volume Family Practice

By Jeffrey Greenfield, D.C.

There are no 'secrets' to having a HVFP (high volume family practice) -- only things that you and I would want in a chiropractor. The first thing that all families will want is availability. You have to be available to adjust your families at all times.

Let me give you a personal example of a chiropractor who will not succeed with a HVFP. I was in Yarmouth, Maine on a Sunday when I knew that I was subluxated and knew that I needed an adjustment. My wife and I laughed because we knew that no one would be in the office on Sunday, and I did not want to disturb anyone at home. As we drove down the main street, we noticed a chiropractic office that was filled with people, and I decided to pop in and see if I could get an adjustment. I introduced myself and asked for an adjustment. The doctor told me that he was busy and could not adjust till later that day.

I left thinking how long does it take to give an adjustment, and if I was a patient and needed an adjustment, I would want one now.

In order to have a HVFP, you must educate your families that the subluxation is a detriment to life and that they need to be checked on a regular basis. So you explain all of this, they understand it, and then on a Saturday night when little Johnny falls down the stairs they call you first. Great! Fantastic! You have them come to your house and you put little Johnny's atlas back into place.

If you don't want to be 'bothered' after office hours by patients, then you don't want a HVFP. If you love to adjust and if your weekend is not complete unless you give 5-10 adjustments, then read on and learn how to be available.

You must push your patients into calling you; they really don't want to. I have a policy in my office that states: "If you feel the need to take any relief-oriented medication or any drug, then call the office and have Dr. Jeff paged."

I tell every new patient that I carry a pager and a portable phone so that they can always contact me, at any time. I recommend that every office spend the $50 to $80 per month for an answering service so that you can always be contacted. (Some "groups" recommend giving patients your home phone number, but what if you are out shopping and don't get home until they have already gone to the hospital.)

Make sure that you always call patients back ASAP. As I stated before, your patients do not want to call, so if they are calling, it must be important. Now that you are on the phone with them, do not spend a lot of time listening to their problem, just say:

The best thing we can do is to give you an adjustment. Can you meet me in 10 minutes?

This is true -- the only thing you can do is adjust them. In fact, it is the best thing for them. When you meet them at your office, at their house, your house or their place of business, make it a quick adjustment. Remember, you have decided to have a HVFP, but this is your time, so a quick adjustment and you are back to 'your time.'

To summarize how you can build a HVFP:

  1. Get an answering service
  2. Carry a pager
  3. Explain importance of adjustments to your patients
  4. Let them know you are always available
  5. Don't listen too long -- recommend an adjustment
  6. Quick adjustment

Your comments and inquiries may be directed to:

Stanley Greenfield, R.H.U.
12873 Huntley Manor Drive
Jacksonville, Florida 32216

Please include a self-addressed, stamped envelope. Thank you.

Editor's Note:

Further advice on finances is available through Mr. Greenfield's newsletter, Greenfield Chiropractic Financial News, #J-314-C, on the Preferred Reading and Viewing List, pages xx.


Click here for more information about Stanley Greenfield, RHU.

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