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Dynamic Chiropractic – November 15, 1999, Vol. 17, Issue 24
Dynamic Chiropractic
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Dynamic Chiropractic

The Korean Four Point System

By John Amaro, LAc, DC, Dipl. Ac.(NCCAOM), Dipl.Med.Ac.(IAMA)

In my last article ("Acupuncture Diagnosis in a Chiropractic/Medical Practice," DC, October 18, 1999 or visit www.chiroweb.com/archives/17/22/01.html ) I discussed the high-technology acupuncture examination known as ryodoraku or "electromeridian imaging" to determine the status of the meridian system.

Since pulse diagnosis as classically taught only allows the practitioner to see a maximum of six to eight patients a day, many practitioners of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) have begun to use modern diagnostic procedures along with classical acupuncture stimulation techniques.

One of the most important issues in clinical acupuncture is establishing a proper diagnosis. This includes determining which of the 12 meridians are involved by either being too high in electro magnetic energy, too low, or split between left and right sides of the body.

Once the status of the meridians are determined by electromeridian imaging (ryodoraku) or by traditional Chinese pulse diagnosis, it is imperative to balance the meridians by toniflying the low meridians and sedating the high ones. In five element acupuncture, balancing between involved meridians is classical and focuses on borrowing excessive energy to supply meridians that are too low.

Acupuncture has numerous approaches around the world, including virtually every Asian nation. However, approximately 600 years ago, the Koreans developed one of the most significant techniques of balancing the meridians. The procedure is virtually unknown to most acupuncturists except in Korea, extreme northern China and in the northern islands of Japan.

The technique requires the use of four specific acupuncture points for each meridian that is shown to be either too high or too low. In Chinese acupuncture, the utilization of the single "tonification" or "sedation" point is all that is classically used.

Even though simple tonification and sedation will suffice in most cases, for those stubborn conditions that are having great difficulty in establishing a balance, this Korean system is ideal. This technique will balance meridians when other procedures will not.

image - Copyright – Stock Photo / Register Mark

When the following meridians are "deficient," treat:
             
Lung
Tonify
SP3
LU9
Sedate
HT8
LU10
Large Intestine
"
ST36
LI11
"
S15
L15
Stomach
"
S15
ST41
"
GB41
ST43
Spleen
"
HT8
SP2
"
LIV1
SP1
Heart
"
LIV1
HT9
"
KI10
HT3
Small Intestine
"
GB41
SI3
"
BL66
SI2
Bladder
"
LI1
BL67
"
ST36
BL54
Kidney
"
LU8
KI7
"
SP3
KI3
Pericardium
"
LIV1
P9
"
KI10
P3
Tri-Heater
"
GB41
TH3
"
BL66
TH2
Gallbladder
"
BL66
GB43
"
LI1
GB44
Liver
"
KI10
LIV8
"
LU8
LIV4
             
When the following meridians are "excessive," treat:
             
Lung
Tonify
HT8
LU10
Sedate
KI10
LU5
Large Intestine
"
SI5
LI5
"
BL66
LI2
Stomach
"
GB41
ST43
"
LI1
ST45
Spleen
"
LIV1
SP1
"
LU8
SP5
Heart
"
KI10
HT3
"
SP3
HT7
Small Intestine
"
BL66
GB40
"
ST36
SI8
Bladder
"
ST36
BL54
"
GB41
BL65
Kidney
"
SP3
KI3
"
LIV1
KI1
Pericardium
"
KI10
P3
"
SP3
P7
Tri-Heater
"
BL66
TH2
"
ST36
TH10
Gallbladder
"
LI1
GB44
"
SI5
GB38
Liver
"
LU8
LIV4
"
HT8
LIV2

image - Copyright – Stock Photo / Register Mark

The four steps for a "deficient" meridian are:

  1. Tonify the horary point of the mother organ.

     

  2. Tonify the mother organ's element point on the affected organ.

     

  3. Sedate the horary point of the controlling meridian (KO cycle).

     

  4. Sedate the controlling organ's element point on the affected organ.

The four steps for an "excessive" meridian are:
  1. Tonify the horary point of the controlling organ (KO cycle).

     

  2. Tonify the controlling organ's element point on the affected organ.

     

  3. Sedate the horary point on the "son" organ.

     

  4. Sedate the son organ's element point on the affected organ.

Once a meridian is determined to be too high or too low, rather than going through the procedure of figuring out which points to use, the points are always the same for each meridian either being too high or too low. Follow the provided charts on pages 50, 51 and 52 to achieve some of the most spectacular clinical results you will ever experience.

Try balancing the involved meridians you have discovered with EMI evaluation with this ancient Korean approach. It has few equals. I personally use it in the most difficult cases.


Click here for more information about John Amaro, LAc, DC, Dipl. Ac.(NCCAOM), Dipl.Med.Ac.(IAMA).

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